"Laburnum" Floor Lamp

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Clara Driscoll (American, 1861–1944)
Manufactured by Tiffany Studios (Corona, New York, 1902–1932)
"Laburnum" Floor Lamp, ca. 1910
Leaded glass and patinated bronze
80 × 24 × 24 in. (203.2 × 60.96 × 60.96 cm)
Gift of the Estate of Alice Uhrig Boese M1977.183
Photo credit: John Nienhuis
Currently on View

Though Louis Comfort Tiffany's name became synonymous with the intricate and colorful lampshades that bore his company's name, gifted female artisans actually produced them. Clara Driscoll led the so called "Tiffany Girls" and made vital yet mostly anonymous contributions to many of Tiffany's famous decorative objects, including the Laburnum shade.

The production of the shade was a laborious process. The shade’s delicately draped flowers and foliage have a natural, floating appearance because the company had developed a way for them to be suspended without a metal band, but it could take multiple women working up to sixty-five hours to complete the work.

Publication History
Goldstein, Rosalie, ed. Guide to the Permanent Collection. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Milwaukee Art Museum, 1986, p. 168, color illus. p. 168.

Vogel, Ann H., ed. Focus: The Flower in Art; Selections from the Permanent Collection. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Milwaukee Art Museum, 1986, p. 24, cat. 34, b/w illus. p. 13.
Exhibition History
Focus: The Flower in Art; Selections from the Permanent Collection, Milwaukee Art Museum, July 10-August 17, 1986.


This information is subject to change as the result of ongoing research.