Ipsa dies aperit: conficit ipsa dies (One Day Brings Forth [a flower], and the Same Day Ends It), part 1, plate 9 from Archetypa studiaque patris Georgii Hoefnagelii

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Joris Hoefnagel Flemish, 1542–1601
Ipsa dies aperit: conficit ipsa dies (One Day Brings Forth [a flower], and the Same Day Ends It), part 1, plate 9 from Archetypa studiaque patris Georgii Hoefnagelii, published 1592 (first edition)
Engraving
plate: 6 1/16 × 8 3/8 in. (15.4 × 21.27 cm) sheet: 7 1/4 × 10 11/16 in. (18.42 × 27.15 cm)
Purchase, with funds from the Ralph and Cora Oberndorfer Family Trust M2008.113
Photo credit: John R. Glembin
Not Currently on View

These charming images were created by Joris Hoefnagel as scientific illustrations, and they served as a sourcebook for visual imagery for years to follow. They were engraved by his son, Jacob (perhaps with the aid of Thedor de Bry), after lost originals and published in the volume Archetypa studiaque patris Georgii Hoefnagelii in 1592. They were designed to appeal to a broad range of artists and humanists.

Many plants and insects are represented in this publication for the first time. A novelty is the repeated motif of the symbiosis between plants and insects. This work stands at the start of a movement that raised engraved floral images to the status of objects worthy of aesthetic regard and inner contemplation. Epigrams on each sheet remind viewers of universal truths and invite them to use th images as sources for personal reflection.

Gallery Label, 2010

Publication History
Sawinski, Catherine. From the Collection--Mezzanine Rotation--Rembrandt and the Natural World. Milwaukee Art Museum: Under the Wings, November 19, 2013. http://blog.mam.org/2013/11/19/mezzanine-rotation-rembrandt-and-the-natural-world/.


This information is subject to change as the result of ongoing research.